Do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions: joint guidance

Since its introduction in the 1960s as a treatment to restart the heart after sudden cardiac arrest from a heart attack, attempts at cardiopulmonary resuscitation have become more common in other clinical situations. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be a lifesaving treatment, with the likelihood of recovery varying greatly depending on individual circumstances; however, overall, the proportion of people who survive following cardiopulmonary resuscitation is relatively low.

Patient safety symposium review: Better clinical decision making and reducing diagnostic error

A major amount of our time working in clinical practice involves thinking and decision making. Perhaps it is because decision making is such a commonplace activity that it is assumed we can all make effective decisions. However, this is not the case and the example of diagnostic error supports this assertion. Until quite recently there has been a general nihilism about the ability to change the way that we think, but it is now becoming accepted that if we can think about, and understand, our thinking processes we can improve our decision